Press Release
Date of issue   Jan 19, 2011 | ID: 36034

Vattenfall's contribution to One Tonne Life

 

Electricity in the tank

The family charges the electrical car in a smart charging station in the carport.

Vattenfall actively works with stimulating progress in the electric car industry. This is done, for instance, by developing and selling charging solutions to transport companies and public outlets. The charging station at the One Tonne Life house is a specially designed wall socket that provides fast and effective charging. It contains a measuring and communication interface that compiles and reports travel data, electricity consumption, and charging and battery status. Vattenfall also collaborates with Volvo and other car manufacturers regarding testing and demonstration of new electric car technology.

 

Energy from the sun

Solar cells on the house roof and exterior provide the house with electricity.

The greatest advantage with the solar cell technology used in the house is that it can be built into the design of the house both in an effective and aesthetic manner. The One Tonne Life house has solar cell panels both on the roof and on the exterior wall facing south which generate, for instance, the required electricity for supplementary heating, ventilation, the fridge and the freezer. All surplus electricity can be used to charge the family's electrically-powered Volvo or be used in the joint electricity grid. The solar cells are supplied by a manufacturer that is partly owned by Vattenfall. Besides the solar cells, there are solar collectors on the roof of the carport which generate energy used to heat water and for heating.

 

Surplus electricity is recycled

When the house generates more electricity than it requires, the surplus is delivered to the electricity grid.

Increasing small-scale and local electricity generation is a step in the development of a sustainable energy system. Energy efficient buildings have a major role to play here, where some of the energy demands in a building are met by domestic generation. The EU objective is that all newly built houses are in compliance with this type of energy efficient home by 2020. Flexible, modified and intelligent electricity grids are a prerequisite if these solutions are to contribute to an effective energy system. 

 

Low carbon electricity

The family can choose electricity from low emission energy sources - from hydro, wind or nuclear power.

One of the easiest ways to reduce our carbon footprint is to choose low carbon electricity. The One Tonne Life family can - as is the case for all Vattenfall customers - decide if the electricity in their house is generated by hydro, wind or nuclear power. Using a Life cycle assessment (LCA), Vattenfall estimates carbon dioxide emissions for every generated kilowatt hour for each energy source.

 

Monitoring consumption

Using the EnergyWatch analysis tool, which is connected to the electricity metre, the family can measure electricity consumption in real time.

EnergyWatch is a smart addition to the standard electricity metre, allowing customers to see how much electricity is used in real time. It can also identify electricity gobblers and analyse where most electricity is being consumed in the household. EnergyWatch has been on the market since November 2010 and will be one of the One Tonne Life family's most important tools in saving electricity and changing their energy behaviour.

 

Energy advice

The family has their own energy coach who helps them to live climate smart.

One way to reduce our impact on the climate is to take control over energy consumption. By becoming aware of what is using the most energy in the home, it is also possible to put in place those energy-saving measures that are the most useful. One of Vattenfall's energy experts is Lasse Ejeklint, who has for instance been providing the Swedish public with energy advice on the national TV channel TV4. Mr. Ejeklint will coach the One Tonne family to live a more energy efficient life. Vattenfall offers energy advice and energy smart products to both private and business customers.

Media Contacts

 

Malin Persson

Manager Safety & Environment Communication

Volvo Car Corporation

 

Phone: +46 31 3254152

mperss58@volvocars.com

 

 

Per-Åke Fröberg

Director Volvo Cars Heritage

Volvo Car Group

 

Phone: +46 31 3257654

Mobile: +46 31 3257654

per-ake.froberg@volvocars.com

 

 
Related Images
ID: 36069 ID: 36070 ID: 36071

Volvo Car Group

PVH50, 50200

SE-405 31 Göteborg

Sweden

Phone: +46 31 59 65 25

Fax: +46 31 54 40 64

https://www.media.volvocars.com/

 

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Göteborg, Sweden
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556074-3089

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